Review: ‘Hamlet’ @ the Royal Shakespeare Theatre

‘Hamlet’: the play everyone quotes without realising. Ever told someone the dog will have his day? Or to thine own self be true? ‘Hamlet’. It explains its profundity and its endurance through history, and why it’s still one of my favourite Shakespeare plays.

The RSC last performed ‘Hamlet’ in 2013, and I was fortunate enough to see the fantastic Jonathan Slinger in the dark role. However, sling your hook Slinger – there’s a new Dane in town, in this deliciously colourful version of the darkest play going.

Paapa Essiedu is at once a young man and soul older than his years; a man who can laugh and play with friends, causing unexpected mirth amongst the audience and making us remember this is someone barely out of education dealing with a tragedy beyond his ken, and yet a man who can give the gravitas to such infamous thoughts as whether ‘to be or not to be’ with gusto. He was at once energetic and dragged down, frenetic yet depressive, twitching yet still inside. Essiedu is a prince on the rise, and if this isn’t the start to an epic career at the RSC I’ll be hugely surprised – he beats Tennant’s hailed Hamlet hands down.

The set and setting were outstanding; to have ‘Hamlet’ as such a bright and colourful event was jarring in the best possible way, showing the real torments of the world Hamlet had to endure. The use of an all-black cast was inspired, showing ‘Hamlet’ to transcend race and culture, and become a play accessible to all.

There wasn’t a weak member amongst the cast, and it’s hard to pick stand outs. I could have cried when Natalie Simpson’s Ophelia lost her mind, especially when screaming horrendously at Gertrude (Tanya Moodie) before being quiet and meek – the role has never been performed move movingly to my eyes. Laertes too, was the most caring brother I have seen in ‘Hamlet’ thus far – I’ve often thought when Laertes declares he’ll give no more tears to one already drowned after Ophelia’s death, it lacks compassion. Marcus Griffiths was not that actor; his denial of tears was difficult, it was a struggle, and it showed him as the caring man his father’s death had set him out to be. Polonius (Cyril Nri) was hysterical as the windbag, and Claudius (Clarence Smith) the perfect blend of ambitiously corrupted and broken.

One thing that happened that I’ve never seen before was Gertrude saw the ghost. This was the moment where I questioned decisions, wondering how the next lines of denial could be spoken, and yet Moodie’s Gertrude was captivating: the bedroom scene became a moment of mother and son united yet divided simultaneously, showing Gertrude making a choice to deny her son’s rationality and use his madness to protect herself. It was unique and well-considered, and made the known play a new experience.

And the end – tragic, devastating and heartstopping. I’m not exaggerating when I say I haven’t seen such a well-choreographed fight scene in my theatrical history; it was flawless without looking overly-rehearsed or like the actors were holding back. And, yet again, a new twist on an old classic in how the fatal blows were dealt, making the excitement as palpable as Hamlet’s hit.

There is just so much to compliment and rave about in this play it could send me mad – a fitting touch for a play so connected with its audience it was literally breathtaking. ‘Hamlet’ plays until the 13th August 2016, and though something be rotten there, visiting the state of Denmark (via Stratford-Upon-Avon) would be a wise choice in this latest RSC masterpiece.

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “Review: ‘Hamlet’ @ the Royal Shakespeare Theatre

  1. Pingback: Review: ‘Cymbeline’ @ the Royal Shakespeare Theatre | The Book of Tomorrow

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